News

Małgorzata Dawidek-Gryglicka is showing in Health and the Climate and Ecological Emergency Exhibition at UCL Hospital Arts Street Gallery, Euston Road, NW1 2BU, from 24 August - 20 October 2021. See the UCLH website for details.

Małgorzata Dawidek-Gryglicka is showing in Health and the Climate and Ecological Emergency Exhibition at UCL Hospital Arts Street Gallery, Euston Road, NW1 2BU, from 24 August - 20 October 2021. See the UCLH website for details.

In the Last Place: Acht Wolfsleben - Collegium Helveticum

In the Last Place: Acht Wolfsleben - Collegium Helveticum

, Luzia Hurzeler, 2021

Luzia Hürzeler has a solo show, In the Last Place: Acht Wolfsleben, at Collegium Helveticum, STW – Semper-Sternwarte der ETH Zürich, Schmelzbergstrasse 25, 8006 Zürich, from 9 October - 13 November 2021. See the Collegium Helveticum website.

Luzia Hürzeler has a solo show, In the Last Place: Acht Wolfsleben, at Collegium Helveticum, STW – Semper-Sternwarte der ETH Zürich, Schmelzbergstrasse 25, 8006 Zürich, from 9 October - 13 November 2021. See the Collegium Helveticum website.

Bright Shadows Point

Bright Shadows Point

, Fiona Curran, 2021

Turing Locke, Eddington, Cambridge

Jo Underhill

A new permanent public art installation, Bright Shadows Point, by artist Fiona Curran has been unveiled at Turing Locke in Eddington, Cambridge.

A new permanent public art installation, Bright Shadows Point, by artist Fiona Curran has been unveiled at Turing Locke in Eddington, Cambridge.

Commissioned through the Contemporary Art Society for Locke hotels, Bright Shadows Point aims to connect the rich history of Eddington with its progressive future.

Using research undertaken by the Cambridge Archaeological Unit at Cambridge University, Bright Shadows Point explores Eddington’s multi-layered history. Curran has drawn from the archaeological excavations of the site, maps indicating former settlement use and artefacts unearthed which date back several thousand years.

Eddington is named after Sir Arthur Eddington, professor of Astronomy and Experimental Philosophy at Cambridge University in the early part of the 20th century. Further inspiration for Curran's work came from photographs taken by Eddington during a complete solar eclipse in 1919. These images helped to map Einstein’s theory of relativity through capturing the curvature of light from the movement of stars.

The shadows cast by the solar eclipse and the creation of shadows on the landscape – from both the ground level and the aerial perspective – highlight the encounters with the site from multiple perspectives.

 All Photo Credits: Jo Underhill

Happy and Glorious

Happy and Glorious

, Shino Yanai

Praying for Tokyo - Well Temperament by Shino Yanai is showing at the Tokyo Biennale, Yushima Seido (17th century Confucian temple, national historic site), from  2 August - 5 September 2021. See the Tokyo Biennale website for details.

Praying for Tokyo - Well Temperament by Shino Yanai is showing at the Tokyo Biennale, Yushima Seido (17th century Confucian temple, national historic site), from  2 August - 5 September 2021. See the Tokyo Biennale website for details.

Christina della Giustina is speaking at Wildfires in the Lab - Creative Experiments Through Art and Science  online via Zoom on Wednesday 14 July 2021. Register via Eventbrite.

Christina della Giustina is speaking at Wildfires in the Lab - Creative Experiments Through Art and Science  online via Zoom on Wednesday 14 July 2021. Register via Eventbrite.

I-solated Contact - Istanbul Art Contact Contemporary Art Fair

I-solated Contact - Istanbul Art Contact Contemporary Art Fair

, 2021

Poster

Jai Chuhan, Jasmir Creed, Raksha Patel, Sharon Morris, Vaishali Prazmari and Andrew Stahl are showing in I-solated Contact at Istanbul Art Contact Contemporary Art Fair, 1 - 4 June 2021. 

Jai Chuhan, Jasmir Creed, Raksha Patel, Sharon Morris, Vaishali Prazmari and Andrew Stahl are showing in I-solated Contact at Istanbul Art Contact Contemporary Art Fair, 1 - 4 June 2021.

Crowd Crystal

Crowd Crystal

, Anna Jochymek, video

Anna Jochymek's video performative project Crowd Crystal is showing online from 14 January - 14 March 2021. There is a public online opening at 7pm on Thursday 14 January, including a panel discussion between Anna Jochymek and Katarzyna Depta-Garapich. See the Watermans' website for further details.

Anna Jochymek's video performative project Crowd Crystal is showing online from 14 January - 14 March 2021. There is a public online opening at 7pm on Thursday 14 January, including a panel discussion between Anna Jochymek and Katarzyna Depta-Garapich. See the Watermans' website for further details.

A Colour A Day: Week 38. 7 - 13 December - Cobalts

A Colour A Day: Week 38. 7 - 13 December - Cobalts

, Jo Volley, 2020

Each pigment is bound in gum Arabic on W&N watercolour paper and read from left to right:Cobalt Violet DarkCobalt GreenCobalt Violet BrilliantCobalt Yellow PaleCobalt Green BluishCobalt Violet Cobalt Titanate Green

This week’s colours, as part of Jo Volley's ongoing A Colour A Day project, are accompanied by a text from Robert Mead in response to the cobalts.

A Colour A Day
Week 38,  7 - 13 December 2020

Follow Jo Volley's A Colour a Day project, a year-long project to celebrate one colour each day by recording a swatch of it, on The Pigment Timeline Blog: https://blogs.ucl.ac.uk/pigment-timeline.

This week’s colours are accompanied with a text by Robert Mead in response to the cobalts.

Cobalt: Pigment of Hope and Destruction

Robert Mead

Cobalt shares an entwined history with both painting and technology. The mineral is capable of producing a range of different colours - perhaps the most commonly known is Cobalt Blue. This is a cobalt aluminate pigment and was first discovered in 1775 – with further modern production achieved in 1777, where the moistening of aluminium compounds with a cobalt solution turned blue and strongly calcined.

A variety of other colours can be produced through cobalt; a range of violets can be created through a variety of different compounds – such as cobalt magnesium arsenate – and cobalt phosphate octahydrate. Cobalt Green has been made by multiple processes including the direct mixture of cobalt blue with ‘chromic’ yellow or a combination of cobalt and zinc or iron oxide. Cobalt Yellow is a potassium cobalt nitrate, first synthesised in 1831 – through the reaction between potassium nitrite and cobalt salts, creating a crystalline mass.

Using cobalt, we are able to produce range of wonderful and unique colours. However, as a mineral its demand has increased alongside the development of new technologies – as a key component of batteries in laptops, phones and increasingly electric cars. The main source of cobalt extraction is in The Democratic Republic of Congo, whose history of colonisation by Belgium from 1869–1908 through to its independence in the 1960s is entwined with the desire for its available supply of minerals such as diamonds, copper and uranium. Now major western companies such as Apple, Dell and Microsoft have bought into the mining industry there, as cobalt suppliers for their lithium batteries, this high demand has led to quarries operating with dangerous conditions and often using child labour.

Furthermore, both the pigment and the mineral itself hold highly toxic particles and when consumed or inhaled and can cause major health risk - increased through poor mining conditions. Further increasing the demand for cobalt is the development of electric cars. As we attempt to offset the climate crisis by moving to using electric vehicles, companies such as BMW and Tesla have also invested heavily in cobalt mining to acquire the material for powering them. In this case, cobalt is at the centre of paradox between hope for moving away from fossil fuels and towards clean electric energy and the negative consequences its acquisition results in.

Without sustainable mining methods, its production is tainted by this problematic discord.In reflecting on cobalt’s significance for our future, it seems prescient that it was the key ingredient in what was considered the doomsday weapon of the Cold War – the Cobalt Bomb (or C-Bomb), theoretically capable of wiping out all human life on the planet and featuring in films such as Beneath the Planet of the Apes and Dr Strangelove. The use of cobalt would allow a much higher level of fallout to be released from detonation, many times greater than the level of residual radiation still present in the strata of the Earth from the era of nuclear testing.

When we look at the alluring colours it can produce we can also consider that cobalt pigments are entwined with both our colonial and technological history and humanities attempts at both healing and destruction.


Robert Mead is a painter and PhD researcher at the Slade School of Fine Art. The aim of his research is to make paintings that form emotive connections between the viewer and our environment which draw them into wider hidden discourses. Robert says of his work; 'Moving through the strata of my paintings digs up histories and ghosts that we may not wish to confront but are bound to our past’ .

Each pigment is bound in gum Arabic on W&N watercolour paper and read from left to right:

Cobalt Violet Dark
Cobalt Green
Cobalt Violet Brilliant
Cobalt Yellow Pale
Cobalt Green Bluish
Cobalt Violet
Cobalt Titanate Green

Six Bells Red

Six Bells Red

, Onya McCausland, December 2020

Arved Colvin-Smith

Onya McCausland launches (online and with a physical presence at Six Bells Mine Water Treatment Scheme in Wales) the first colour in the range of paint called ‘Six Bells Red’ on Friday 11 December at 12noon.

Onya McCausland launches (online and with a physical presence at Six Bells Mine Water Treatment Scheme in Wales) the first colour in the range called ‘Six Bells Red’ on Friday 11 December at 12noon. Join on Zoom: https://ucl.zoom.us/j/92082269256. To find out more about her research, see the turninglandscape.com website.

Onya McCausland, an artist graduated from UCL Slade School of Fine Art, has produced the first ever exterior / interior grade mineral based emulsion wall paint made from 100% waste ochre materials. Onya has also created a collection of paintings called ‘Colour From The Mines’ (see here for details https://onyamccausland.com/ucl/  and https://onyamccausland.com/europe/  

Friday 11th December sees the launch (online and with a physical presence at Six Bells Mine Water Treatment Scheme in Wales) of the first colour in the range called ‘Six Bells Red’

  • Six Bells Red is a first edition.  It has been specially created - burnt at a specific temperature - and thereby producing a limited amount of this particular pigment. 
  • This will be a special limited edition of 100 one litre tins. Up to 50 tins will be given to the public and organisations across Gwent for the opportunity to participate in the project by painting buildings, houses, doors, gates and walls. 
  • In addition, 1,000 tubes of artists’ oil paint named ‘Six Bells Burnt Ochre’ (each with its own individual serial number) will be made available for sale at www.turninglandscape.com, retailing for £25. All proceeds from Turning Landscape CIC (Community Interest Company) sales will be recycled back into the project to fund more paint creation - alongside an art education programme at Six Bells. 
  • A cast iron plaque with a map of the site will be installed at the site, marking it as the source of the paint. The plaque will be visible from the footpath at the far north end of the perimeter fence.  

Onya McCausland, who developed the idea of turning recycled coal mine sludge into paint while studying for her PhD at the Slade, visited mine sites across former British coalfield locations in South Wales, Scotland, Lancashire and Yorkshire.

Onya travelled around the country collecting samples of ochre to take back to a UCL laboratory and her studio where through painting, she discovered striking differences between the colours depending on their geographic location. 

Onya's practice develops an original and innovative approach to the role of the art object by making paint - including integrating its site of formation - as an artwork, that is co-produced with manufacturers and members of the local ex-mining community. Paint in tubes and tins are considered as ‘art objects’ or editioned prints for distribution and use by the community. Onya wants to encourage individuals and organisations to take up using this paint as part of a collective multi part public artwork next year. It will be free to local residents on application.  

Onya McCausland said, "The mine water treatment schemes are the really important link between the colour, the material and the place. They reflect an important part of Britain’s cultural, social and industrial history and legacy.” 

The project has been funded by the Leverhulme Trust, the Slade School of Fine Art and UCLI&E, a group of specialists at UCL who help its academics and students turn their ideas into reality.  

UCLI&E help has included guidance and advice as well as funding from its Knowledge Exchange Fund.  UCLI&E support has also enabled the commercialisation of the paints and engagement of local communities to help bring the initiative to life. It has also been supported by Michael Harding Paints. 

SHERDS poster

SHERDS poster

, 2020

Nastassja Simensky and Rebecca Lee's SHERDS: Five Verses on Six Sacks of Earth will be live on Radiophrenia, a temporary radio station, on 19 November 2020, 4:00 - 5:30 pm (GMT). 

Nastassja Simensky and Rebecca Lee's SHERDS: Five Verses on Six Sacks of Earth will be live on Radiophrenia, a temporary radio station, on 19 November 2020, 4:00 - 5:30 pm (GMT).

SHERDS is an experimental work based on a six-week archaeological dig which took place at Malkin Tower Farm in Pendle, during the hot summer of 2018. Performed by an ensemble of musicians, archaeologists and vocalists, SHERDS brings together spoken word, improvisation, vibrating rocks, field recordings, live audio and new compositions. The programme draws on the specialisms of each of the ensemble to collapse, unearth, backfill and reassemble the rhythms and processes of archaeological excavation, changing land-use and herstory.

Performed by Alison Cooper, Bobby Cotterill, Caroline Trutz, Kelly Jayne Jones, Nastassja Simensky, Rebecca Lee, Sophie Cooper, Rebecca Atherton and Bernie Velvick. Spoken Word from archaeologists Danielle Knights, Katy Soar, Catherine Reardon, Rick Peterson and Aidan Parker and local historian John Claydon.  

SHERDS is developed from a commission by Pendle Hill Landscape Partnership and In-Situ, is funded by Sound and Music, Jerwood Arts, Arts Council England, and The National Lottery Heritage Fund, and supported by The Harris and Nottingham Contemporary.

To listen online use the Chrome web browser to open the pop out player on Radiophrenia’s website 

Radiophrenia is also broadcast across Glasgow on 87.9 FM, on Resonance Extra via its website, TuneIn and Radioplayer and on DAB+ Digital Radio in Brighton & Hove, central Bristol, Cambridge, Greater London and Norwich.

The broadcast schedule includes a series of 20 newly commissioned radio works, live shows and pre-recorded features. Check out the rest of Radiophrenia’s lineup on their website. 

Carpet Pixels III

Carpet Pixels III

, 2020

PhD student Vaishali Prazmari presents Carpet Pages III: Pixels online 26 October - 25 November. Show also features work by Vaishali, current PhD students Jumana Abboud and Robert Mead and alumnae Aya Haidar and Rosalind Whitman. See the Carpet Pages III website.

PhD student Vaishali Prazmari presents Carpet Pages III: Pixels online 26 October - 25 November. Show also features work by Vaishali, current PhD students Jumana Abboud and Robert Mead and alumnae Aya Haidar and Rosalind Whitman. See the Carpet Pages III website.

Free tickets to Carpet Pages III: Pixels Meet the Artists Private View online events at Eventbrite:

 

 

Melancholia - The Freud Museum

Melancholia - The Freud Museum

, 2020

Kasia Depta-Garapich and Cherry Song are showing in Melancholia at the Freud Museum, 20 Maresfield Gardens, London NW3 5SX, from 21 October - 15 November 2020. See the Freud Museum website for further information.

Kasia Depta-Garapich and Cherry Song are showing in Melancholia, commissioned by the UCL Psychoanalysis Unit, at the Freud Museum, 20 Maresfield Gardens, London NW3 5SX, from 21 October - 15 November 2020. See the Freud Museum website for further information.

Green Apples

Green Apples

, Yva Jung, 2020, jesomite, 80 x 20 x 8 cm (depth variable)

Yva Jung is showing in Open Call, König London, 259 - 269 Old Marylebone Road, London NW1 5RA, from 12 August - 19 September 2020. See the König London website for details.

Yva Jung is showing in Open Call, König London, 259 - 269 Old Marylebone Road, London NW1 5RA, from 12 August - 19 September 2020. See the König London website for details.